Home » Archive

Articles in the Yenisey Basin Category

Baikal Lake, Essential Publications, Greening Silk Road, Mongolian Great Lakes, Selenga River, World Heritage Convention »

[30 Jul 2021 | Topics: ]

Dams threatening Lake Baikal and five other iconic areas are featured in a new report by Friends of the Earth US “World Heritage Forever? How Banks Can Protect the World’s Most Iconic Cultural and Natural Sites”.

Baikal Seal

The report is examining how the international banking sector lacks strong policies and practices to protect World Heritage and other internationally recognized sites. Drawing on six case studies, the report calls on financial institutions to adopt the Banks and Biodiversity No Go policy, which …

Angara River, Baikal Lake, Featured, Selenga River, World Heritage Convention »

[24 Jul 2021 | Topics: ]

Irkutsk Hydro inside the City of Irkutsk, powerplant owned by the En+Group, nowadays being used to convert Lake Baikal into flood-control reservoir to safeguard from flooding illegally built facilities in the Angara River floodplain

On July 23 the 44th Session of the World Heritage Committee, held at Fuzhou in China, unanimously approved (without discussion) a new Decision on the Lake Baikal – the most troubled property of the Russian Federation. As an observer at the Session, Eugene Simonov, Coordinator of the Rivers without Boundaries …

Amur Basin, Arctic, Featured, Kamchatka Peninsula, Lena River, Ob Basin, Solidarity, Yenisey Basin »

[9 May 2021 | Topics: ]

One of the most striking speeches of the recently concluded 20th Session of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues was the address delivered by the Vice President of the Far Eastern Federal District chapter of the Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North, Siberia and Far East of the Russian Federation. Liubov Odzyal spoke on the challenges many northern Indigenous Peoples are facing globally nowadays, including those in Kamchatka. The issue is the large-scale destruction of salmon, the foundation of Indigenous Peoples’ wellbeing. «Kamchatka.Live» is publishing the full text …

Baikal Lake, Greening Silk Road, World Heritage Convention »

[5 Apr 2021 | ]

The shore of Siberia’s Lake Baikal that has seen the building of most hotels is now covered by algae caused by releasing untreated waste into the water. Every wave brings more algae [Image by: Vitaliy Ryabtsev]

After the closure of the Baikal cellulose-paper industrial complex in 2013, the main cause of pollution for the great Siberian lake became mass tourism. In 2019, the flow of tourists was three to four million per year.

One of the environmental consequences of tourism is the
pollution of the …

Essential Publications, Greening Silk Road, Mongolian Great Lakes, Selenga River, Torey Lakes, Uldz River, World Heritage Convention »

[26 Mar 2021 | Topics: ]

“Blue Horse” also known as “Bluecifer” . Source: https://masterok.livejournal.com/2328912.html

In many transboundary basins of the World the lack of joint plans of shared basin management based on the latest environmental and hydrological research prompts riparian countries to unilateral actions for water accumulation and use within their respective boundaries, while ignoring environmental consequences of such practice. The countries often present such projects as voluntary commitments under the Paris Agreement.

Dam is being built across floodplain of Ulz river just in 27 kilometers upstream of the transboundary …

Amur Basin, Arctic, Central Asia Basins, Essential Publications, Lena River, Ob Basin, Yenisey Basin »

[28 Jan 2021 | Topics: ]

A report by the United Nations University has said that by 2050, most of the world’s population will live downstream of dams operating at or beyond their design life, which could have implications on public safety, escalating maintenance costs, and reservoir sedimentation.

The report, “Ageing Water
Infrastructure: An Emerging Global Risk”, by the Canada-based UNU Institute for Water,
Environment and Health (UNU-INWEH), says most of the 58,700 large dams
worldwide were constructed between 1930 and 1970 with a design life of 50 to
100 years, adding that at 50 years a large concrete dam “would …