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Articles in the Yenisey Basin Category

Baikal Lake, Greening Silk Road, World Heritage Convention »

[5 Apr 2021 | ]

The shore of Siberia’s Lake Baikal that has seen the building of most hotels is now covered by algae caused by releasing untreated waste into the water. Every wave brings more algae [Image by: Vitaliy Ryabtsev]

After the closure of the Baikal cellulose-paper industrial complex in 2013, the main cause of pollution for the great Siberian lake became mass tourism. In 2019, the flow of tourists was three to four million per year.

One of the environmental consequences of tourism is the
pollution of the …

Essential Publications, Greening Silk Road, Mongolian Great Lakes, Selenga River, Torey Lakes, Uldz River, World Heritage Convention »

[26 Mar 2021 | Topics: ]

“Blue Horse” also known as “Bluecifer” . Source: https://masterok.livejournal.com/2328912.html

In many transboundary basins of the World the lack of joint plans of shared basin management based on the latest environmental and hydrological research prompts riparian countries to unilateral actions for water accumulation and use within their respective boundaries, while ignoring environmental consequences of such practice. The countries often present such projects as voluntary commitments under the Paris Agreement.

Dam is being built across floodplain of Ulz river just in 27 kilometers upstream of the transboundary …

Amur Basin, Arctic, Central Asia Basins, Essential Publications, Lena River, Ob Basin, Yenisey Basin »

[28 Jan 2021 | Topics: ]

A report by the United Nations University has said that by 2050, most of the world’s population will live downstream of dams operating at or beyond their design life, which could have implications on public safety, escalating maintenance costs, and reservoir sedimentation.

The report, “Ageing Water
Infrastructure: An Emerging Global Risk”, by the Canada-based UNU Institute for Water,
Environment and Health (UNU-INWEH), says most of the 58,700 large dams
worldwide were constructed between 1930 and 1970 with a design life of 50 to
100 years, adding that at 50 years a large concrete dam “would …

Featured, Gobi Groundwater Basins, Greening Silk Road, Kherlen River, Paris vaut une barrage(?), Selenga River, Solidarity »

[1 Nov 2020 | Topics: ]

Vulnerable Kherlen River the victim of water diversion plans

Before 2000 there were no mines in
South Gobi apart from the state-run Tavan Tolgoi coal mine. But over the past
two decades, foreign investment has flooded in, with companies now operating 12
large mines, including Rio Tinto’s Oyu Tolgoi, one of the world’s biggest
copper and gold mines. Driven by the mining industry’s growing demands, the
government estimates that the region’s groundwater will run dry within a few
years.

Much of Mongolia’s water is in the
north, and the government now plans to pipe this water to the arid …

Baikal Lake, Featured, Greening Silk Road, Mongolian Great Lakes, Ob River, Onon River, Uldz River »

[29 Apr 2020 | Topics: ]

Chinese workers celebrate completion of a hydropower project in Uzbekistan. March 2020

Global Civil Society Call on Chinese Authorities to Ensure that COVID-19 Financial Relief is Not Targeted to Harmful Projects along the Belt and Road.

On April 29, 2020, the Rivers without Boundaries along with other 260 civil society groups across the world called on the Chinese government to ensure that COVID-19 related financial relief for struggling Belt and Road projects flows only to high quality investments satisfying specific criteria, and avoid bailing out projects already mired in environmental, social, biodiversity, …

Amur Basin, Featured, Gobi Groundwater Basins, Greening Silk Road, Mongolian Great Lakes, Selenga River, Torey Lakes, Yenisey Basin »

[5 Jan 2020 | Topics: ]

Orkhon river polluted by gold mining (UMMRL August 2019)

Since May 2019 Onggi river movement, jointly with United Movements for Mongolian Rivers and Lakes (UMMRL) has restarted a legal fight to enforce the Law with Long Name( a law to protect headwaters of rivers, protected zones of water reservoirs and forested areas) passed in July 2009 by Mongolian parliament under decisive pressure from civil society. By drafting and pushing through the Law the UMMRL could succeed in creating a legal background for cancelling and revoking 1782 mining licenses, which includes 391 …