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Georgian woman at the “Iron Wall” dividing the Rioni River valley

On June 5th, the day of Environmental Protection the Rivers without Boundaries International Coalition congratulates all people protecting their rivers around the world. If we are allowed to choose a place and movement today that symbolizes this noble task, we want to highlight a marathon fight of the people of Georgia against the destructive and irresponsible hydropower construction projects pursued by consecutive corrupt governments. Georgian government failed to build Khudoni Hydro, Nenskra Hydro and several other megaprojects due to popular …

Amur Basin, Essential Publications, Featured, Gobi Groundwater Basins, Greening Silk Road, Lena River, Paris vaut une barrage(?) »

[1 Jun 2021 | Topics: ]

A new joint study between the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) and the Korea Energy Economics Institute (KEEI), provides their perspectives on the interconnection potential in Northeast Asia and “insights for policy makers and key stakeholders”.

The dream of “Asian Supergrid” has continuously inspired not only  visionaries from Russia, Japan, Korea, Mongolia and China, but also studies by UNESCAP, ADB, Energy Charter Secretariat and other international organizations. It is not fully clear what is the real motive and added value of IRENA for joining this already diverse and poorly …

Greening Silk Road, Paris vaut une barrage(?), Solidarity »

[11 Feb 2021 | Topics: ]

According to the International Hydropower Association, starting in early 2021, the Swiss Government-funded three-year initiative will see IHA Sustainability, the organisation’s non-profit subdivision, work with project developers, alongside regulators, investors and civil society organisations from Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, North Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia. They will try to reestablish good name for “sustainable hydropower”, which is probably a hopeless business given the history of hydropower development and its current reputation in the Balkans. Parliament of Bosnia and Herzegovina blocked all new small hydro project applications last year, now …

Paris vaut une barrage(?), Solidarity »

[18 Dec 2020 | Topics: ]

International anti-dam protest in Georgia, where many dams are funded by the EU institutions

The Rivers without Boundaries International Coalition provided recommendations “On Hydropower and Infrastructure for Water Transport Impacts on Freshwater Bodies, Ecosystems and Species” as its submission on Draft Delegated Act (DA) on Sustainable-finance and EU classification-system-for-green-investments.

The text of draft DA dilutes and weakens recommendations
made to European commission by special Technical Expert Group tasked to draft this
legislation. The RwB raises six important points:

1) The RwB is deeply concerned that EC does not follow the TEG’s advice that “Construction …

Essential Publications, Greening Silk Road, Paris vaut une barrage(?), Solidarity »

SHORT SOBERING REPORT

Enashimskaya Hydro in Siberia

Since the Report by World Commission on Dams (Nov.
2000) for 20 years there has been relative consensus that large hydro is
associated with excessive social and environmental impacts and should be given
no green ticket into sustainable future. Somehow it was simultaneously
stipulated that “small hydro is OK” and it took two decades and thousands of
ruined rivers to start questioning this type of “green energy”.

Major international energy organizations(like the the IEA or IRENA) have already stopped dividing hydropower into “small” and “large” about 3-5 years ago as it …

Featured, Gobi Groundwater Basins, Greening Silk Road, Kherlen River, Paris vaut une barrage(?), Selenga River, Solidarity »

[1 Nov 2020 | Topics: ]

Vulnerable Kherlen River the victim of water diversion plans

Before 2000 there were no mines in
South Gobi apart from the state-run Tavan Tolgoi coal mine. But over the past
two decades, foreign investment has flooded in, with companies now operating 12
large mines, including Rio Tinto’s Oyu Tolgoi, one of the world’s biggest
copper and gold mines. Driven by the mining industry’s growing demands, the
government estimates that the region’s groundwater will run dry within a few
years.

Much of Mongolia’s water is in the
north, and the government now plans to pipe this water to the arid …