Home » Archive

Topic: Dauria going dry

Amur Basin, Argun River »

[8 Jan 2012 | Topics: ]

At the 5th International Conference “Earth from space – most effective solutions”, in December 2011, Moscow State University (MSU) hydrologists presented the results of research on expected consequences of water infrastructure projects in the basin of the transboundary Argun River. The scientists came to the conclusion that if all planned water management projects in Chinese part of the Argun River flow are implemented, the floodplain area in the river valley will decrease by half.
Experts from Land Hydrology Department at the MSU geographic faculty have been carrying the investigation …

Amur Basin, Yenisey Basin »

Argun, Shilka and Amur river ecosystems are all threatened by water infrastructure planned or already built by China. China still refuses to discuss with Russia agreement on environmental flow on Argun River, that may soften impacts of Hailaer-Dalai massive water diversion. State-owned Yangtze Power Co. together with En+Company propose to dam Shilka River near its mouth. And all Chinese national development plans still have 3 to 9 most dangerous dams on the Amur River transboundary channel. However Rivers without Boundaries must acknowledge that Chinese policies on transboundary rivers gradually become …

Amur Basin, Torey Lakes »

[2 Jun 2011 | Topics: ]

China is planning to build cross-border wetlands and nature reserves in its northeastern provinces to protect precious bird and fish species, the Minister of Environment Protection Zhou Shengxian said Thursday.
The wetlands and nature reserves will be built at the lower reaches of such transnational rivers as the Heilongjiang River, Wusuli River and Tumen River, Zhou said at a China-Russia environmental protection conference in Harbin, capital of northeastern Heilongjiang Province.
"China is willing to join hands with Russia to expand environment protection by deepening cooperation in such areas as biodiversity, wetland protection …

Amur Basin, Argun River, Featured »

[21 Jan 2011 | Topics: ]

Dalai Lake is shrinking. For years, the water level of northern China’s largest freshwater lake – lying on the Hulunbuir grasslands of Inner Mongolia, close to the borders with Mongolia and Russia – has been falling. Since 2009, the local government has been trying to halt the decline by siphoning off water from the Argun River, which forms part of the boundary between Russia and China. But Dalai’s long-term future is still unclear.
Dalai is a huge body of water – the fifth biggest of China’s freshwater lakes. And its importance …