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Articles in the Selenga River Category

Featured, Gobi Groundwater Basins, Greening Silk Road, Kherlen River, Paris vaut une barrage(?), Selenga River, Solidarity »

[1 Nov 2020 | Topics: ]

Vulnerable Kherlen River the victim of water diversion plans

Before 2000 there were no mines in
South Gobi apart from the state-run Tavan Tolgoi coal mine. But over the past
two decades, foreign investment has flooded in, with companies now operating 12
large mines, including Rio Tinto’s Oyu Tolgoi, one of the world’s biggest
copper and gold mines. Driven by the mining industry’s growing demands, the
government estimates that the region’s groundwater will run dry within a few
years.

Much of Mongolia’s water is in the
north, and the government now plans to pipe this water to the arid …

Amur Basin, Featured, Gobi Groundwater Basins, Greening Silk Road, Mongolian Great Lakes, Selenga River, Torey Lakes, Yenisey Basin »

[5 Jan 2020 | Topics: ]

Orkhon river polluted by gold mining (UMMRL August 2019)

Since May 2019 Onggi river movement, jointly with United Movements for Mongolian Rivers and Lakes (UMMRL) has restarted a legal fight to enforce the Law with Long Name( a law to protect headwaters of rivers, protected zones of water reservoirs and forested areas) passed in July 2009 by Mongolian parliament under decisive pressure from civil society. By drafting and pushing through the Law the UMMRL could succeed in creating a legal background for cancelling and revoking 1782 mining licenses, which includes 391 …

Baikal Lake, Featured, Greening Silk Road, Selenga River, World Heritage Convention »

[4 Dec 2019 | Topics: ]

Lake Baikal shore in winter (RwB)

December 3. Moscow. Mongolia and Russia have finally signed an agreement on cooperation in electric power, development of which was triggered by Mongolia’s plans to build hydropower plants in Lake Baikal basin to achieve self-sufficiency in energy sector. On the part of Mongolia, such desire was partly due to lack of long-term agreement with neighbors for reliable electricity supply at affordable price.

The necessity for such agreement has been discussed at least since 2014 and was always viewed in conjunction with difficult negotiations on …

Baikal Lake, Greening Silk Road, Selenga River »

[27 Jul 2019 | Topics: ]

On July 24 a web-journal towardfreedom.org published an article by Lital Khaikin “Between Sacred Waters and Natural Capital: Resistance to Hydroelectric Dams in Mongolia” 

Egiin Gol – still a free-flowing river

In recent years, Mongolia has sought
to expand its construction of hydroelectric dams in the northern provinces,
where large watersheds connect Mongolia to the Buryat’ Republic in Siberia.
Since the introduction of Mongolia’s Action Plan for Implementation of the
Green Development Policy for the period of 2016–2030, the country has
identified the river-systems in the northern provinces of …

Baikal Lake, Featured, Selenga River, World Heritage Convention »

[30 Jun 2019 | Topics: ]

The RwB Guide to the 43rd WH Committee Session, 2019

Vice-president of Azerbaidzhan Alieva opens the World heritage Committee Session

The 43rd Session of the World Heritage
Committee is opening today in Baku, Azerbaijan. This is an overview of most
pressing river and dam related issues planned for review or voiced by NGOs.

The 6th International NGO Forum on
World Heritage was be held on June 29th with participation of
representatives of World Heritage Center, IUCN, ICOMOS and many civil society
groups involved in conservation efforts in Africa, Australia, Asia, and the
Americas.  Forum discussed impacts of
climate change and …

Amur Basin, Amur River, Angara River, Baikal Lake, Essential Publications, Featured, Greening Silk Road, Kamchatka Peninsula, Onon River, Selenga River, Solidarity, Torey Lakes, Uldz River, World Heritage Convention »

Lake Baikal – the Largest Hydropower Reservoir on Earth

The RwB and World Heritage Watch presents the final complete version of the “Heritage Dammed” Report, dedicated to protection of natural freshwater ecosystems. This colorful report contains contributions from 30 civil society organizations (CSOs), experts and dam-affected communities around the world.

The Report documents how water infrastructure plays key role in degrading aquatic ecosystems at more than 50 World Heritage properties, of which 42 sites are threatened by hydropower.  Fourteen in-depth case studies illustrate and analyze the global threat to the rivers, …